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New Website

Dolphin Sutures has launched its new website on www.DolphinSutures.com

 

The website is trendy and designed to help users browse better and find content faster. The new Dolphin Sutures site offers richer, in-depth content, career and blog section.

 

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5th Meditex Bangladesh

Dolphin Sutures participated in the 5th edition of Meditex Bangladesh. Several products like general sutures, cardiovascular sutures and surgical tapes were showcased at their stall and received a good response from visitors which included surgeons, distributors and purchasing authorities of top hospitals.

 

 

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Ultrathin PLLA Nanosheet to Surpass Conventional Suture Treatment

In an initial report on the fabrication of free-standing nanosheets for biomedical applications, scientists at Tokyo's Waseda University in Japan have developed a biodegradable thin film of only about 20 nanometers thickness that could replace surgical stitches.

Applying nanosheets with poly-L-lactide (PLLA) to the incisions of mouse stomachs, the team found that these centimeter-long biodegradable nanosheets healed the incisions without scarring or tissue adhesion.

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Students embed stem cells in sutures to enhance healing

ScienceDaily (July 26, 2009) — Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering students have demonstrated a practical way to embed a patient's own adult stem cells in the surgical thread that doctors use to repair serious orthopedic injuries such as ruptured tendons. The goal, the students said, is to enhance healing and reduce the likelihood of re-injury without changing the surgical procedure itself.

 

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Robot Improves Suture Profiency

Robot improves suture proficiency more rapidly for surgeons inexperienced in laparoscopic techniques

 

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