Antibacterial sutures, are the sutures coated with antibiotics or other agents possessing antibacterial properties. They are developed to help the wound healing by reducing the risk of surgical site infections.

 

There are several antibacterial sutures with different coating materials like triclosan, chlorhexidine and silver nano particles. These coatings may be provided on various regular sutures to add the antibacterial and antifungal property to the sutures.

 

Antimicrobial effects of sutures will depend on the length of skin incision, extent of wound contamination at operation, and concurrent diseases amenable to infections, such as diabetes.

 

Antimicrobial-impregnated implants, will prevent the bacterial adhesion and biofilms formation, avoid long-term, ineffective, systemic antibiotics, reduce the risk of microbial resistance generation and for implant removal. Ideally, antiseptics have a rapid potent and broad microbiocidal spectrum with long-lasting effects and no risk of developing antimicrobial resistance. They are bio-compatible with medical products, not impair the healing processes and be well tolerated in wounds with no toxicity or systemic absorption. A surface coating containing silver nano particles will slowly release silver ions into the coating layer and subsequently the solution. Silver ions will bind the bacterial membrane and proteins, causing cell lysis.

 

Many investigators have examined the relationship of suture construction and chemical composition as it relates to bacterial attachment and surgical infection. For example, Rothenburger et al , 2002, report ability of coated polyglactin 910 sutures with triclosan to inhibit the growth of wild-type and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis using several in vitro models. From this it is explicit that any suture product of natural or synthetic composition and of mono or multi-filament construction is susceptible to bacterial attachment and colonisation.